You May Not be Prepared for This Catastrophe

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https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140625182754-3842661-you-may-not-be-prepared-for-this-catastrophe/

At a recent conference with over 100 audience members, I made a startling discovery when the presenter posed several questions where I learned all of us may not be prepared for this catastrophe:

“How many of you know what your blood pressure is?” Almost all hands went up.

“How many of you know what your cholesterol levels are?” Again, almost all hands went up.

“How many of you know what your credit score is?” Quite a few hands went up.

“How many of you have a professional resume ready to send out tomorrow?” Virtually no hands went up.

You May Not be Prepared for This Catastrophe

The presenter paused for effect. Conversation in the audience buzzed.

The presenter continued, “As an audience, you are well aware of the level of danger in regards to something that MIGHT kill you in 30 years. But virtually none of you are prepared for the career and financial opportunities and catastrophes that could overtake you tomorrow. Let’s talk about it.”

As a recruiter and resume writer, the importance of always having an up-to-date resume was clear to me. I was impressed that these 4 simple questions could point out the potential for professional catastrophe.

“…none of you are prepared for the career and financial opportunities and catastrophes that could overtake you tomorrow. Let’s talk about it…”

His key points stuck with me as I considered ideas that would assist my clients to prepare for success instead of catastrophe.

By following my simple 5 step plan, candidates and clients report that many more opportunities are finding their way to them. Without a plan the statistics favor catastrophe. Don’t be another statistic.

1. Whenever you update your resume, save a version with a title such as “Working Resume” or “Resume with notes,” or “Resume to Update,” or “Next resume.”

2. Every six months, update with your current position with new information. (Describe duties OR copy/paste position description.)

3. Update your resume whenever you complete a major project. (Sometimes all you need is a ‘tickler’ to remind you of an accomplishment. A good resume writer will know how to ask questions regarding such projects to elicit information relevant to hiring managers.)

4. If you are a professional or a consultant, keep your resume current at all times. (Most of the cost and effort associated with a good, professionally-written resume are incurred the FIRST time it is written. Constant updating of a resume that is already in “good” condition should not be an onerous expense.)

5. Keep your resume and profiles ‘active’ on LinkedIn and Job Boards by re-posting frequently. (You can do this yourself or find a company that will do it for you – the cost can be minimal.)

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